Spectrum Connections Blog

Want to understand the Neurodiversity Spectrum, Anxiety, OCD, Trauma and/or Neurodivergent Relationships? Or simply to get advice, updates and reading recommendations? Welcome to Dr. G’s Blog!

Anxiety

How to Know the Difference Between an Autistic Meltdown Vs. Panic Attack

It’s often hard enough to understand the differences between an anxiety attack and a panic attack. But when you or someone you care for has autism, understanding the differences between an autism meltdown and a panic attack is a whole different ballgame. There’s no question that autism can often cause distress and dysregulation. Sometimes, it

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Trauma

How Does Trauma Affect the Brain

Most people have a basic understanding of some of the symptoms of trauma. Even if their only exposure is on the silver screen, things like flashbacks, vivid memories, and fear are commonly portrayed as long-term effects of traumatic experiences.  While some of those depictions are more accurate than others, most people don’t dig deep enough

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Autism

Eye Contact and Autism: What to Know for Affirming Care

When someone does not make eye contact with you, you’ll likely make some unhelpful and harmful assumptions. For starters, you might think they’re not interested in what you have to say or, at the very least, distracted. On another level, limiting eye contact might signal a lack of empathy to you. In fact, many neurotypical

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OCD

How Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is Diagnosed

Most people have a basic understanding of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). But, you might not recognize the signs or symptoms enough to determine if you or someone you care about actually has the disorder.  Unfortunately, that lack of information or understanding could be what’s keeping you from getting the official diagnosis and help you need. 

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Autism

Helpful ERP Therapy Considerations for the Autism Spectrum & OCD

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder can often co-occur with the Autism Spectrum Condition. In fact, 17.4-37 % of autistic individuals also can have OCD at the same time (vanSteensal, et., al 2011; Zabowski & Storch, 2018). For the purpose of this blog post, I will refer to autism in identity first language. It’s important to remember to

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Anxiety

Is OCD an Anxiety Disorder?

While historically OCD was considered a form of an anxiety disorder, because the intrusive thoughts trigger an anxious response, most recently in 2013 OCD has been classified as its own disorder by the American Psychological Association. Anxiety is one of the most common mental health conditions in the world. But there are several different types

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OCD

The Impact of OCD on Relationships

OCD can impact nearly every area of your life. Many people focus on how it affects your career or education. But, on a daily basis, you’ll have to deal with how it affects your relationships. From friends and family to romantic partners, OCD can play a major role in your thoughts and behaviors when it comes

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Trauma

Finding Healing From Relationship Trauma

No one gets into a romantic relationship expecting things to go south. If you’re putting your trust in a romantic partner, experiencing emotional, mental, or physical abuse from them can feel like the ultimate betrayal. Depending on the situation and those involved, it can even be traumatic.  Relationship trauma occurs when any kind of abuse exists

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Autism

Is There a Link Between OCD and Autism Spectrum?

Aril is autism awareness and acceptance month. So in honor of this, and to highlight the neurodiversity-affirming and trauma-informed work we do at Spectrum Connections Therapy, we will share some more resources and blogs this month related to autism. At Spectrum Connections Therapy, we specialize in both Autism and OCD and this post will focus

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OCD

Important Considerations for OCD Treatment in Children

It’s estimated that about 1-2% of kids struggle with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and OCD is notably the 4th most common psychiatric condition in the United States (www.iocdf.org). The most common onset age occurs in the late teen years, but OCD can impact younger children as well. While OCD can impact children slightly differently and range in

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